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Salivary flow and dental caries in Brazilian youth

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Salivary flow and dental caries in Brazilian youth
Salivary flow and dental caries in Brazilian youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Although type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has a significant impact on oral health, its association with dental caries is yet not clear.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the salivary flow rate and caries in Brazilian youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Setting and Design: A Cross-sectional study was performed in a tertiary university hospital.
Materials and Methods: Fifty-one age matched subjects suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus were selected for the study and evaluated for the following: salivary flow rate, number of decayed, missing and filled tooth in permanent dentition (DMF-T) and decayed, extracted, filled tooth index in the deciduous dentition (def-t); visible plaque index (VPI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI). Statistics and analysis: The t test was utilized when the variables showed normal distribution.

The Mann-Whitney test was utilized for comparing non-normal variables.
Kolmorgorov-Smirnov test was used to assess the normality assumption.
The differences were considered significant when P < 0.05.

The age and gender distribution of patients and controls was 11.3 ± 3.4 years (56% males) and 11.9 ± 3.4 years (37% males).
The mean glycated hemoglobin value in the diabetics was 9.7 ± 1.9%.
Salivary flow rate was lower in the diabetic pateints as compared to controls (P = 0.02).
No differences were found in the DMF-T/def-t indices of diabetic and non-diabetic patients (P = 0.43/0.14).
VPI was similar in both the groups (P = 0.15).
GBI was higher in the diabetics (8.1 vs. 5.18; P = 0.11).
There were no differences in the dental caries experience and dental plaque in the two groups.

The lower salivary flow rate in diabetics could have been related to their higher GBI.
The higher GBI in the diabetics is a matter of concern in the diabetics and is a sign for higher chances of developing periodontal problems.




Source: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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